Gaming Addiction Affecting Gamers

Back to Article
Back to Article

Gaming Addiction Affecting Gamers

Photo Courtesy of: Pixabay

Photo Courtesy of: Pixabay

Photo Courtesy of: Pixabay

Savannah Fleisch, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






To most people, video games are a fun way to hang out with friends or cure boredom on an uneventful Friday night. However, what is typically seen as a hobby is now an actual a disorder. The World Health Organization has officially classified the addiction to video games, Video Game Disorder, as a mental health issue. This disorder is dominant in children and young adults. Parents frequently complain that their kids are attached to their screens and games everyday, but some don’t think that this disorder is worthy of being a condition. Video game player and junior Justin Erickson said, “ Video game disorder isn’t real; it’s like saying you’re addicted to football.” Junior Abby Lovell agreed, saying “They’re just games for fun and [they] give me something to do.”

To be diagnosed with video game disorder, certain symptoms would need to be present. First, the individual would likely begin their addiction by prioritizing video games over life interests and daily activities. Next, the person plays video games even though it’s causing negative consequences, such as lack of sleep. Lastly, the addiction worsens when the control of playing video games is impaired.

However, this does not imply that all gaming is bad. These electronic games can also be used for therapeutic reasons in regards to people who are going through serious illnesses like cancer, depression and diabetes. History teacher Mr. Testa said, “ Video games can be fun and educational. [They can relieve] stress and have great health benefits like hand eye coordination.”  Though Video Game Disorder is a real problem, not everyone is at risk of acquiring it.