Teens Sad all the Time—Why is That?

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Teens Sad all the Time—Why is That?

Photo Credit Savannah Fleisch

Photo Credit Savannah Fleisch

Photo Credit Savannah Fleisch

Savannah Fleisch, Reporter

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School can seem like a place where the adults of the future go to get a great education, but to some the pressure of work overwhelms them to the point of breaking them. Grades are just one of the reasons teens get discouraged; they can make them feel inadequate, like they will never achieve their dreams. “That happens because I kind of stress over my future and what’s going to happen if I don’t get an A on this or if I don’t do this. It can cause problems,” junior Citlali De la Torre said.

Photo Credit Savannah Fleisch

Moreover, sadness and depression are causing adolescents to struggle to juggle their educational and family life. It’s even possible for honor students who seem like they have everything together to crack under the weight of feeling inferior. “I feel like when I’m really stressed I get down because I do a lot of extracurriculars, but sometimes when I feel overwhelmed I just get really sad. I don’t really have a great support system either so that’s another reason kids could be sad,” junior and after school tutor Jasmine Garcia said.

 

However, there can be great support systems.  Find a support system or coping mechanism that works. People like working out, breaking stuff or just talking to their family, friends or pets. “Listen. Be supportive and figure out solutions to problems,” one local LHC counselor who wished to remain anonymous said.  

No matter how bad things get, there is always a bright side to life; you just have to find it and keep it close. Issues such as peer pressure, academic expectations and changing bodies can bring constant ups and downs for teens. According to the Mayo Clinic, for some teens, the lows are more than just temporary feelings — they’re a symptom of depression. Since suicide is the third leading cause of death among teens, it’s critical to diagnose depression early and seek treatment. As a result, LHHS added a suicide hotline to the student ID cards 800-248-8336.